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TheYachtMarket.com Southampton Boat Show set to celebrating 50 years of boating excellence

Taking place from 14-23 September 2018, this year’s Show will boast an expected 100+ debuts and more than 500 exhibitors
Taking place from 14-23 September 2018, this year’s Show will boast an expected 100+ debuts and more than 500 exhibitors

This year TheYachtMarket.com Southampton Boat Show (https://www.southamptonboatshow.com/) celebrates its golden anniversary. Over the last 50 years it has been the launchpad for boating legends, seen the evolution of ground-breaking technology and tracked the rise of global marine brands. Visitors will be able to see the best of the past alongside the latest and most innovate craft and technology on the market.

Taking place from 14-23 September 2018, this year’s Show will boast an expected 100+ debuts and more than 500 exhibitors, of which 81 will be new to the Show for 2018. Additionally, it and will showcase pioneering environmental research.

The Show will also mark the 50th anniversary of the first single-handed non-stop circumnavigation of the globe with Sir Robin Knox-Johnston’s Suhaili on display. Plus, sporting stars and celebrity supporters of the event over the last 50 years will be welcomed and there will be a touch of the late 1960s in the new Guinness Bar and refreshments area. What’s more, any golden couples from Southampton celebrating their 50th anniversary during the Boat Show (14-23 September) will gain free entry to the event.

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New method to assess structure durability of aged ships announced by Ship Structure Committee

The method developed utilizes a ship specific 3-D hydrodynamic model to simulate the ship’s rigid body dynamic response to wave conditions, measuring the resulting ship motions and pressure distribution on the hull.
The method developed utilizes a ship specific 3-D hydrodynamic model to simulate the ship’s rigid body dynamic response to wave conditions, measuring the resulting ship motions and pressure distribution on the hull.

The Ship Structure Committee is pleased to announce the publication of a new report, SSC-474, titled Structural Assessment of Aged Ships, authored by Mr. Gregory Walker, Mr. Brendan Connell and Mr. Sean Kery of CSRA. The detailed 75 page report is available for free using the link at the end of the article below.

The report describes the development of an assessment process to accurately predict the survivability of a corrosion-degraded ship in specific wave conditions. The method developed utilizes a ship specific 3-D hydrodynamic model to simulate the ship’s rigid body dynamic response to wave conditions, measuring the resulting ship motions and pressure distribution on the hull. Pressure and acceleration data from the hydrodynamic model is then input into a 3-D finite element model of the degraded ship structure where the resulting stresses in stiffeners and plating are assessed against various failure modes, including buckling modes, which are calculated according to IACS Common Structural Rules. The results form the basis of a degraded ship strength assessment which can be provided to a ship owner and operator to make operational and repair decisions.

The report describes the development of an assessment process to accurately predict the survivability of a corrosion-degraded ship in specific wave conditions. The method uses a ship-specific 3-D hydrodynamic model to simulate the ship’s rigid body dynamic response to wave conditions, measuring the resulting ship motions and pressure distribution on the hull.

Pressure and acceleration data from the hydrodynamic model is then put into a 3-D finite element model of the degraded ship structure where the resulting stresses in stiffeners and plating are assessed against various failure modes, including buckling modes, which are calculated according to IACS Common Structural Rules. The results form the basis of a degraded ship strength assessment which can be provided to a ship owner and operator to make operational and repair decisions.

This ultimately allows operators to understand the risk of, and help minimize the probability of structural failure when operational requirements, budgets or schedule do not permit the full remediation of the degradation. It may also be useful when assessing when a specific hull needs to be removed from service and scrapped.

After conducting a limited study of the Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB), a US Navy Auxiliary ship, with uniform corrosion beyond the typical 25% limit, hull bottom plate buckling coefficients rise dramatically, so that even in the lower sea states buckling of the hull plating is possible.

A more thorough investigation may reveal other failure locations with less than 25% wastage. Future research on this topic could consider and evaluate the residual strength of a ship structure with localized corrosion damage. Localized and nonuniform structural corrosion and pitting are probably more common than uniform corrosion across the entire hull structure, but is very case-specific.

The approach that the report uses to assess a degraded ship structure can be expanded and used to develop a safe operating envelope for a ship’s hull structure with various degrees of corrosion. While many simplifications of scope and assumptions were made for this project, a more thorough assessment of a degraded ship structure can be accomplished, but would require modeling the ship’s actual corrosion levels, more seaway conditions, more headings and more ship loading conditions, amplifying loadings to account for expected exposure times, and investigating more structural components such as internal tank bulkheads and their internal fluid loadings.

In addition, green seas, whipping, and slamming effects may need to be addressed. This more rigorous assessment, while possible, would be a costly and time consuming effort, the report concludes.

Read the 75 page pdf report in full: Structural Assessment of Aged Ships

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Broken valve causes oil spill while bunkering

The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel's bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve.
The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel’s bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve.

The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel’s bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve. Following investigation, the Club recommended that all involved parties should be informed when tanks are switched and that the crew must always ensure the valves are completely shut and working.

The incident
The vessel was loading in port and had also planned to bunker fuel using shore trucks. The plan was to load the fuel into port tank 2 and fill it 96%, but the chief engineer changed this just before loading and instead wanted to load port and starboard 3 tanks. The plan was to fill these tanks 90%. The number 3 tanks were half the size of the port and starboard 2 tanks.

The bunker system was lined up to bunker the port 3 tank. Deck scuppers were put in place on deck. The chief engineer then met the truck driver to agree on basic hand signals before connecting the hose to the ship’s manifold. The plan was to have the 3rd engineer taking manual soundings from the deck, as the chief engineer didn’t think the automatic sounding system in the engine control room was accurate enough.

An oiler assisted the 3rd engineer. A deck fitter and oiler were standing by the manifold, so they could visually see the truck driver from their position. The chief engineer was on deck monitoring the operation and only one oiler was present in the engine room.

The sounding pipe for the port 3 tank was by the superstructure and the chief engineer told the 3rd engineer to change tank when it reached 80% and then switch to the starboard tank. The 3rd engineer measured the soundings every 6 minutes.

When the port 3 tank was about 80% full as per the 3rd engineer’s calculations, he went to the engine room and opened the valves for starboard tank 3 and then closed the valve for the port 3 tank.

The hydraulic butterfly valves in question are located in the engine room but are controlled from a computer in the engine control room. The 3rd engineer did not verify the valve indicators on the valves themselves to ensure that port tank 3 was closed but verified that bunkers were being transferred into starboard tank 3 by noting that the automatic sounding system showed the level of bunker in the tank to be increasing.

The 3rd engineer went back on deck and started taking soundings in the starboard tank. He did not take any more soundings in the port tank. Suddenly the chief engineer, who was on deck, saw oil coming out of the air vent of the port 3 tank. He shouted and waved to the truck driver to stop the bunkering.

Before the truck driver managed to stop the bunkering, some of the oil overflowed into the water. The chief engineer called the master, the general alarm was sounded and the port authorities were informed immediately. Checking the valves to the engine room, the 3rd engineer opened the valves to the settling tank and started to pump oil from port tank 3 to the settling tank.

It was later found that the valve to port tank 3 was not completely shut and oil had entered the tank until it overflowed.

Safety issues
Always ensure that all involved parties are informed when tanks are switched. Reduce the flow from shore or stop the bunkering when switching tanks.
– It is essential to verify that the valves are completely shut and in working condition. This should preferably also be done manually to verify that the valve is closed.
– It is also essential that the tank system is working correctly and that it can be monitored with confidence in the engine control room. Just trusting manual soundings is not appropriate. It would also have been appropriate to sound the port tank when returning to deck to ensure the level was not increasing.

Download the pdf document: Broken-valve-causes-pollution

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Concerns over new Australian commercial vessel safety system highlighted in recent IIMS survey

The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS) has released details of a poll undertaken in the past week amongst its Australian members, which reveals serious concerns in the industry about the operation of the new national system for commercial vessel safety introduced by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) on 1 July 2018.

The survey of 60 local IIMS members found that over half of respondents believe the new system will result in vessels being less safe to operate; 29% said they will be far less safe.

Nearly two-thirds of respondents (64%) said they found it either difficult or very difficult to access information, understand legislative requirements and get decisions from AMSA, while 79% said that AMSA did not listen to surveyors, or takes their views into account when formulating policy and systems.

The introduction of the national system has seen responsibility for commercial vessel safety transfer from local state and territory agencies to a single national agency, AMSA. The system has been promoted as improving marine safety while reducing red tape and streamlining costs. However, feedback from IIMS marine surveyor members following the introduction of the system suggests it is having the opposite effect.

Problems with the system raised by surveyors include a major increase in the amount of paperwork they have to complete, difficulties in interacting with AMSA’s systems, a lack of resources allocated to prepare for the changes and fears that vessel safety will be compromised due to changes in the scope and frequency of vessel surveys.

“The reality is that AMSA has bowed and sold out to industry on every occasion,” commented one surveyor. “The tail wags the dog in this case. They have not made any decisions based on a positive safety outcome. The mantra is to reduce requirements and reduce costs. This, however, has no long-term benefits and achieves only the opposite,” he added.

“Recent changes to survey schedules ignore generations of experience of accidents and incidents,” commented another. “People are going to die if this isn’t stopped.”

Adam Brancher, IIMS immediate Past President and managing director of Kedge Marine Surveyors based in Hobart, said that while the implementation of the national system had been known months in advance, the detail of its operation was only made available to marine surveyors five weeks ago. As a result, the amount of paperwork required has increased five-fold, increasing the time it takes to complete a survey and, ultimately, making it more expensive for vessel owners.

He said, “Part of the problem is that vessel records previously held by state agencies have not been transferred to AMSA, resulting in surveyors having to provide a lot more information to AMSA.”

AMSA recently announced an extension to the levy-free period for commercial operators to three years. However, according to survey respondents, commercial operators will eventually end up more paying more in the long run.

“In three to four years’ time when the majority of mandatory inspections will be due and government funding is exhausted the impact on industry will be catastrophic,” commented one surveyor.

Another surveyor raised the issue of vessels up to 12 metres being classified as “non-survey” and subject only to self-assessment rather than a mandatory survey.

“This is the same system that delivered the fatal Malu Sara incident that saw the vessels not undergo any survey compliance checks, rather a trust and verify model that failed,” he said.

Mike Schwarz, IIMS Chief Executive Officer said, “It is clear from the number of completed surveys returned to IIMS and the strong depth of feeling from respondents that the new scheme and the upheaval it has caused is of major concern amongst member surveyors in Australia.”

He added, “Given the depth of those feelings, I would encourage AMSA and the Australian National Government to take note of the survey results and urge them to reach out to the Australian marine surveying sector as a matter of urgency to understand their frustrations and to find a workable resolution that is acceptable for all parties involved.”

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RRS Sir David Attenborough polar research ship launched

The UK’s polar research ship RRS Sir David Attenborough was launched into the River Mersey, Birkenhead on Saturday July 14.

Once in the river, tugs towed the 129-meter (423-foot) 10,000 ton hull to Cammell Laird’s wet basin for the next stages of construction. The polar research ship is scheduled to commence operation in 2019.

More than 3,000 shipyard workers, engineers, scientists and maritime industry experts gathered with special guest speakers, including world-renowned broadcaster Sir David Attenborough, to celebrate.

Commissioned by the Natural Environment Research Council (part of UK Research and Innovation), built by Cammell Laird and operated by British Antarctic Survey, this is the biggest shipbuilding contract in Britain in 30 years.

The RRS Sir David Attenborough is a multi-purpose vessel combining scientific research with Antarctic base supply duties. Facilities onboard include a 4x4m clear opening moonpool to deploy subsea equipment, 650 square meter deck space and an enclosed science hangar to house containerized laboratories. Designed to IACS Polar Class PC4 rules, the ship will be able to break on-meter-thick ice at up to three knots. The diesel / electric propulsion has been selected to have ultra-low environmental impact including careful management of all emissions and noise.

Commissioned by the Natural Environment Research Council (part of U.K. Research and Innovation), built by Cammell Laird and operated by British Antarctic Survey, this is the biggest shipbuilding contract in Britain in 30 years.

The RRS Sir David Attenborough is a multi-purpose vessel combining scientific research with Antarctic base supply duties. Facilities onboard include a 4x4m clear opening moonpool to deploy subsea equipment, 650 square meter deck space and an enclosed science hangar to house containerized laboratories. Designed to IACS Polar Class PC4 rules, the ship will be able to break one meter thick ice at up to three knots. The diesel/electric propulsion has been selected to have ultra-low environmental impact including careful management of all emissions and noise.

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