Handyguides

What A Marine Surveyor Needs To Know About Surveying FRP / GRP Craft
There are a number of differing views of fibreglass boats, the traditionalist often referring to them as bath tubs or tupperware boats. But the simple truth is the average yachtsman in the current age just does not have the time or money to devote to the high maintenance of a traditional or classic yacht.
Fibreglass boats do not have to be bath tubs and a lot have been constructed showing considerable style and character which is pleasing and offer a very acceptable performance. Fibreglass is a good and reliable material that has stood the test of time since its inception back in the 1950s.
This handy guide does not set out to explain the finer details of GRP/FRP glass fibre construction, but it gives helpful pointers and an insight into the material, how it is prepared and then attached and its various properties as a composite. Gaining some practical experience of these systems will help the surveyor in his/her assessment of craft produced in this way.
For many surveyors, FRP/GRP will be their area of specialism as most of the vessels they survey will be made from this material and for them this handy guide is a useful companion.

Author: John Kilhams
ISBN: 978-1-911058-21-2
Size: 44 pages

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What A Marine Surveyor Needs To Know About Paint Failure, Corrosion and Rectification
In this handy guide, the authors take readers through an A-Z of specific words, phrases and jargon giving clear advice on how to spot and rectify issues. There are also examples of coating materials, how the finished product should look and photographs to illustrate some of the faults and defects which may be encountered in their use.
Roger and Peter mention some of the different examination and analytical techniques, from simple observation through to sophisticated analysis that is used to determine the causes of coating failures. Techniques include coating thickness measurements, optical and electron microscopy, EDX analysis and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy).Ultrasonic techniques can be used to determine metal thicknesses and metal loss due to corrosion.
What A Marine Surveyor Needs To Know About Paint Failure, Corrosion And Rectification by Peter Morgan and Roger Weatherhead is an essential companion that any surveyor should have as part of their reference collection.

 

Authors: Roger Weatherhead and Peter Morgan
ISBN: 978-1-911058-20-5
Size: 220 pages

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What A Marine Surveyor Needs To Know About Using Computers in Marine Surveying
Nicholas (Nick) Parkyn has an extensive background in both the marine and information technology disciplines. His work in the marine industry includes marine surveying, yacht and small craft design and marine software development. As an IT&T consultant he has held positions which include senior consultant positions with Hewlett Packard and the Centre for Information Technology Research at the university of Queensland. Based on his experience and background, he brings together experience from all the contributing disciplines to apply to this subject.
Computers play a vital role in all aspects of marine surveying in today’s world and this handy guide sets out to explain the use of computers and computer software available to enable the marine surveyor in the operation of his/her business. There are many software packages to choose from and making the right selection that fits with your requirements as a surveyor is of key importance. Get it right and your computer will become an invaluable friend. And as Nick himself says, “The potential use of computers in marine surveying is limited only by your imagination”.
What a marine surveyor needs to know about using computers in marine surveying is an essential addition to the big ship or small craft surveyor’s library.

Author: Nicholas Parkyn
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-19-9
Size: 64 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about synthetic (composite) yacht rigging

Synthetic rigging (manmade fibers) was first introduced in the late 1980s with wider adoption and usage from around 2002. Synthetic rigging (also referred to as composite rigging) is disruptive technology that in time will replace stainless steel wire rigging totally.
Since marine surveyors will increasingly encounter this type of rigging, they need to understand this new technology to enable them to carry out surveys on craft and vessels which use it. In this fast growing and rapid-paced industry sector, Nicholas (Nick) Parkyn delves into standing and non-standing rigging as well as taking a brief look at next-generation fibers and the monitoring and load sensing of rigging.
Nicholas (Nick) Parkyn has an extensive background in both the marine and information technology disciplines. An IIMS member, based in Queensland, Australia, Nick’s work in the marine industry includes marine surveying, yacht and small craft design and marine software development. He is experienced in composite design and fabrication and has specified synthetic rigging on designs since 1994. He was one of the first to apply Spectra to marine applications.
Nick has studied computer science, marine surveying (DipMarSur–YSC) and yacht design. As an inventor he holds a number of patents and has presented papers at numerous marine conferences and written technical articles too.

Author: Nicholas Parkyn
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-17-5
Size: 112 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about yacht and small craft report writing (2nd Edition)

Marine surveying requires that a Report is provided to the client on completion of the survey. This is one of the most important aspects of a marine surveyor’s job and it is vital it is produced succinctly, correctly and with a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail.
The Report is the surveyor’s intellectual property. If the report is good and provides an accurate account of the condition of the surveyed vessel, with precise details and recommendations, it will lead to a happy relationship with the client. Get it wrong and, at best, the client will be displeased; and, if it goes really wrong, the surveyor could end up having to defend his/her position in a court of law.
The skill of writing an excellent report is one of the key assets a marine surveyor needs to master. In this second edition of ‘What a marine surveyor needs to know about yacht and small craft report writing’, author John Kilhams shares his extensive knowledge gained over many years in the field and has added some new information, including worked examples for surveyors to study.
This handy guide sets out to provide the essential guidelines to assist surveyors in how to gather evidence, prepare and layout their reports. It looks at what clauses should be included, where they should be used and how to ensure an accurate and factual report is produced.

Author: John Kilhams
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-18-2
Size: 68 pages

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What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Surveying Sails

Ian Nicolson was a doughty pioneer in the field of ocean cruising in his early years. He emigrated by sail in 1952 to Vancouver, Canada. He returned to Britain by hitchhiking across Canada and building himself a small wooden yacht cruiser near Halifax, which he sailed home singlehanded across the Atlantic in 1954. He continues to sail regularly.

Having written over 20 books and many articles on design, construction, operation and handling of small marine craft, Ian is perfectly placed to apply his knowledge and experience to the subject of sail surveying. The aim of the Surveying Sails handy guide is to give a comprehensive overview of the skills and knowledge required by a marine surveyor to satisfactorily undertake this important task. The guide is depicted with 16 beautifully hand-drawn sketches and diagrams – a Nicolson trade mark – to explain what a surveyor should be looking for, with hints and tips. He explores where to carry out sail surveys, what to look for and how to report it. As well as reviewing the different types of sails, including mizzens, genoas and storm jibs, Ian also talks about sail cloths, battens and roller furling gear.

Author: Ian Nicolson
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-16-8
Size: 48 pages

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What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Yachts, Small Craft & Workboats)

Author, Capt Barry Thompson is a doyen of the marine surveying profession having been in the business for over half a century. Furthermore, he is a Fellow of the Nautical Institute and an Honorary Fellow of the International Institute of Marine Surveying

The principle aims of What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Yachts, Small Craft & Workboats) is to convey both the basic requirements and the special ones so that the surveyor may become conversant with the customary protocols surrounding surveys for insurance claims associated with the industry.
Barry strongly argues that a yacht and small craft surveyor’s lack of marine insurance knowledge should not be a cause for concern; nor indeed should it prevent him from accepting an instruction to carry out a survey which may become concerned with an insurance claim. He says that an understanding of marine insurance in general is not necessary, but that the essence lies in carrying out these surveys to seek, find and report the facts surrounding the incident to his instructing principle, the insurer.
As Barry himself says, “If a surveyor receives a request to carry out an insurance claim survey, its purpose is still fundamentally the same as with most surveys — to investigate and provide the facts relating to the incident and then report his findings. In his enquiries he uses his expertise and experience to consider the facts, to evaluate them to help him ascertain the cause and to determine the best means of minimizing the loss.”

Author: Capt Barry Thompson
ISBN: 978-1-911058-15-1
Size: 68 pages

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What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Cargo Claims)
Says Capt Barry Thompson, author of this handy guide, “If a surveyor receives a request to carry out an insurance claim survey, its purpose is still fundamentally the same as with most surveys — to investigate and provide the facts relating to the incident and then report his findings. In his enquiries he uses his knowledge and experience to consider the facts and evaluate them to assist in establishing the cause and to determine the best means of minimizing the loss.”
The purpose of What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Cargo Claims) is to convey both the basic and the special requirements to give the surveyor sufficient knowledge to become conversant with the customary protocols surrounding surveys for insurance claims associated with the cargo shipping industry.
While there are some general procedures and considerations, which the surveyor needs to understand in his approach to an insurance survey, there are also some specific ones relating to cargo. A surveyor’s lack of marine insurance knowledge should not be a cause for concern, or restraint in accepting an instruction to carry out a survey which may become concerned with an insurance claim; nor is an understanding of insurance generally of importance in carrying out these surveys because the essential requirement is the seeking and reporting of the facts surrounding the incident.

Author: Capt Barry Thompson
ISBN: 978-1-911058-14-4
Size: 68 pages

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What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Commercial Ships, Hull & Machinery)

Capt Barry Thompson, a Fellow of the Nautical Institute and an Honorary Fellow of the International Institute of Marine Surveying, is a name known to many in the shipping marine surveying world. In this handy guide, he debunks the myth that a surveyor’s lack of marine insurance knowledge should be a cause for concern, or restraint in accepting an instruction to carry out a survey, which may become concerned with an insurance claim; nor is an understanding of insurance generally of importance in carrying out such a survey because the essential requirement is the seeking and reporting of the facts surrounding the incident.
In his enquiries, the surveyor uses his knowledge, expertise and experience to consider the facts and evaluate them to assist in establishing the cause and to determine the best means of minimizing the loss. While there are some general procedures and considerations, which the surveyor needs to understand in his approach to an insurance survey, there are also some specific ones relating to commercial vessels, hulls and their machinery.
The aim of What a Marine Surveyor Needs to Know About Insurance Damage Surveys (Commercial Ships, Hull & Machinery) is to convey both the basic requirements and the special ones and to help the surveyor to become conversant with the customary protocols surrounding surveys for insurance claims associated with the shipping industry.

Author: Capt Barry Thompson
ISBN: 978-1-911058-13-7
Size: 68 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about surveying metal craft
Steel boats may be made of a variety of metals. Very old vessels may be built of iron. Ordinary carbon steel, usually called mild steel, is commonly used. Shipbuilding quality steel is not used as much as it is not easy to source. Cor-Ten steel is sold as a low rust product, but there is no universal opinion about this special formula.
In this handy guide, written by the doyen of marine surveyors, Ian Nicolson draws on some comparisons:
Surveyors are detectives, looking for clues. When they find them, they have to deduce what caused such things as discolouration, dents or broken fastenings. Surveying is also like veterinary work, as both practitioners cannot get answers to questions asked. Good eyesight, excellent lighting and an enquiring mind which never falters on the job are what surveyors need.
Surveyors look for defects as they work. They peer into every space, crawl through the bilge, sometimes go up the mast, shine their torch under and round the machinery. Cracks, dents, rust, discolouration, corrosion, broken parts are all put down in their report.
Ian’s expertly, beautifully hand-drawn sketches and diagrams add to the overall appeal of this guide.

Author: Ian Nicolson
ISBN 978-1-911058-12-0
Size: 68 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about small craft engine surveys

Many marine surveyors consider the survey of the machinery to be outside the scope of a pre-purchase or insurance survey and simply ignore it. Small Craft Engine Surveys is designed to give the marine surveyor who has limited experience of machinery surveys sufficient knowledge and confidence to enable him or her to understand both what and the implications of what is involved.

Having studied mechanical engineering at college and then an indentured apprenticeship with a well-established marine surveyor, Elliott Berry has spent the last 19 years surveying small craft engines of all types and sizes.

 

 

 

 

Author: Elliott Berry
ISBN: 978-1-911058-11-3
Size: 168 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about small craft & superyacht valuations
The valuer’s job is to ensure that he or she lays out all the facts in a clear, concise, and logical manner, that is easily understandable by all concerned, and that his or her conclusions clearly justify his final valuation. The role of the valuer is a contentious one at the best of times, and attempting to value something like a yacht that is often considered by the owner to be their pride and joy, or a potential for bankruptcy, can be a difficult and nerve wracking process for a surveyor. Phil hopes that his advice given in this booklet aids in some way, small craft surveyors to provide more accurate and justifiable valuations.
Phil Duffy lives in the South of France and is the managing director of Interface Marine, a yacht and boat survey company established in 2006. The company carries out all types of survey work on small boats to Super Yachts, along with vessel valuations. Phil initially trained as an engineer before following a career at sea spanning 30 years on both sides of the Atlantic, including Master and Chief engineer on Super Yachts up to 50 meters, Dive operations in the Caribbean and Central America, and as Master on Commercial High Speed Ferries.
Phil is quoted as saying that his “most valuable experience gained towards becoming a successful small craft surveyor, was with five years spent as a charter boat skipper in the Caribbean in the early nineties, when it wasn’t unheard of to sail overnight to find a fax machine, and if something broke you had to quickly learn how to fix it!”

Author: Capt Phil Duffy
ISBN: 978-1-911058-10-6
Size: 44 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about dynamically positioned vessels

More than 50 years ago, Shell built a 400T core drilling vessel with automatic heading and position control; the Eureka. Heading and position was maintained by two 200 horse power steerable thrusters. Control was by analogue computer. Since then, of course, things have changed beyond recognition and dynamic positioning is now an essential part of the modern day maritime world and a subject many marine surveyors embrace in a routine fashion, although to some it remains a mystery.

In ‘What a marine surveyor needs to know about dynamically positioned vessels’, Hugh Raynor sets out to explore the subject and explain in simple terms what dynamic positioning is and why it is needed. He says that DP has evolved into a highly complex beast, and in many ways the systems now in place on modern vessels are every bit as sophisticated and safe as can be found on any new jet airliner.

To fully describe and explain DP within a few pages is not possible; however, through this guide Hugh offers an insight into the mysterious world of DP, explaining its uses and functions.

Author: Hugh Raynor
ISBN: 978-1-911058-08-3
Size: 60 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about business management skills

Doing business is relatively easy.

Doing business and making a sustainable profit and creating longer term wealth are far tougher. The aim of ‘What a marine surveyor needs to know about business management skills’ is to give some practical ideas, structure, tips and advice that a surveyor can take into his/her business to enhance what they do.

Mike Schwarz, IIMS Chief Executive Officer, draws on over 35 years’ experience gained from managing big businesses employing dozens of staff with thousands of customers to smaller enterprises with just a few people operating in niche markets. He argues that any personality type can be successful in business.

In this guide, Mike covers everything from selling to marketing, the use of the web and social media, the importance of customer service, simple terms of business and much more.

 

Author: Mike Schwarz, IIMS Chief Executive Officer
ISBN: 978-1-911058-09-0
Size: 92 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about Marine Surveying an introduction

Captain Barry Thompson’s aim in writing this guide is to condense into a few pages the very wide range of activities which comprise marine surveying. It is also intended to convey a little of what it means to be a marine surveyor and the role these surveyors play within the marine industries.

As will be seen, there are four main avenues of service by surveyors and it is hoped that the information in this booklet will be of assistance to all who wish to know more about the subject. This especially applies to any enthusiast wishing to become a marine surveyor who will find in the following pages some indication of where his or her skills may best be used.

There is plenty in this booklet which will be helpful to those wishing to gain a better understanding of what marine surveyors do, what experience and qualifications they require and how they go about their surveys.

There is much more which will assist even those who already have some experience but wish to widen their knowledge of surveying and carry out their surveys more effectively.

Author: Capt Barry Thompson
ISBN: 978-1-911058-07-6
Size: 64 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about knowledge management
Nicholas (Nick) Parkyn has an extensive background in both the marine and information technology disciplines. His work in the marine industry includes marine surveying, yacht and small craft design and marine software development. As an IT&T consultant he has held positions which include senior consultant positions with Hewlett Packard (USA & Canada) and the Centre for Information Technology Research at the University of Queensland (Australia). Based on his experience and background, he brings together experience from all the contributing disciplines to apply to this subject.
Today we have a challenge that our ancestors did not have: the “general” knowledge base doubles every four to five years, making knowledge management essential. Personal knowledge management is a set of activities that a person uses to gather, classify, store, search, retrieve, and share knowledge. It is based on the concept that knowledge workers increasingly need to be responsible for their own growth and learning and represents a bottom-up approach to knowledge management.
This handy guide is a practical guide to knowledge and knowledge management. It provides a background to the subject and a practical insight into what is required and how to setup a computer based personal knowledge management solution. Some aspects focus on the enablement of yacht and small craft surveyors; however most aspects are just as applicable when used by commercial ship marine surveyors too.

Author: Nicholas Parkyn
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-06-9
Size: 52 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about surveying wood craft

In this book, Ian Nicolson covers the nature of wooden vessels… he likens them to animals… “The backbone of a boat is the keel, with the stem, stern post and horn timber.
The frames and beams are the ribs, while the skin is formed by the planking and decking. This analogy goes further. Just as with an animal (or a human) damage to the skin is seldom serious even when quite extensive, so it is with a boat…”
What a marine surveyor needs to know about surveying wood craft explores backbones, frames, floors, planking, stringers, beams, knees, decks, cabin tops and deck houses, cockpits, bulkheads, rudders and tillers, furniture, engine bearers and drip trays, engine casings, spars, hose testing, fastenings, electrolysis, paint and varnish.
The written words are further enhanced by a series of a dozen, beautiful and intricate, hand produced drawings and diagrams by the author himself. These diagrams depict where to look for potential issues in a wooden craft such as rot, as well as showing how a vessel made of wood is constructed.
Ian comments… “Surveyors have to enhance their skills by reading and studying boat construction and repairs, in order to become ever more proficient. One reason for keeping up-to-date is that wood boatbuilding is still being developed. Such is the human spirit and enthusiasm to make progress and to enhance every branch of technology that new boat-building and repair techniques continue to be invented.”

Author: Ian Nicolson
ISBN: ISBN 978-1-911058-04-5
Size: 60 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about working in enclosed spaces

it is generally accepted that the definition of ‘an enclosed space’ is a space which has limited openings for entry and exit and it not intended for continuous worker occupancy, which inevitably leads them being hazardous environments.

Too many surveyors (and other maritime crew and workers) have come to harm because of a lack of knowledge about how to operate safely in enclosed spaces. In Working in Enclosed Space, the authors Capt Michael Lloyd and Adam Allan, (who are both highly experienced in this field of operation), have written a concise, technical reference for surveyor personnel involved in entering enclosed spaces for inspection purposes.

 

 

 

 

Authors: Capt Michael Lloyd and Adam Allan
ISBN: 978-1-911058-00-7
Size: 68 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about small craft metal hulls and ultrasonics

Hull survey methods are the means and procedures necessary to detect defects and damage at an early stage in order to prevent failure and/or breakdown. They are, therefore, not only a comprehensive means of detecting such deficiencies and/or monitoring the vessel’s structural condition, but also defining schemes for inspection between the last overhaul and before the occurrence of failure.

In Small Craft Metal Hulls & Ultrasonics, Jeffrey calls on his 70 years of practical, hands on experience as a surveyor to write what is an easy to read and understand book for small craft surveyors with any level of experience.

 

 

 

 

Author: Jeffrey Casciani-Wood
ISBN: 978-1-911058-03-8
64 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about small craft, ship and boat-building terminology

For 70 years Jeffrey Casciani-Wood has been ‘messing about with and on boats and ships’ as he likes to put it. He has devoted a life time to his profession and craft as well as to the art of marine surveying. This unique and remarkable book is the culmination of the author’s 70 years’ knowledge and experience built up in the boat and shipping industry. In Small Craft, Ship and Boatbuilding Terminology, Jeffrey has pulled together a glossary of terms for literally hundreds of words relating to wood and steel boats, timber, fibre reinforced plastic boats, rigid inflatable and ferro-cement vessels in what must surely rank as one of the most comprehensive publications of its kind ever published. This book is quite simply an essential resource and guide for marine surveyors, no matter what their level of experience, or where in the world they live and practice and will become a constant source of reference.

 

 

Author: Jeffrey Casciani-Wood
ISBN: 978-1-911058-01-4
Size: 148 pages

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What a marine surveyor needs to know about imaging techniques

In Imaging Techniques, Milind Tambe sets out to explain the science and aesthetics of photography which would benefit a marine surveyor. His aim is not to teach photography, but to help surveyors understand their cameras better and then create better images, and if possible artistic ones that speak for themselves of the situation and condition that the surveyor has seen on board the ship or boat.

Milind is an established marine surveyor with a strong interest in photography and practices this as an art form for pleasure. He is a Fellow of the International Institute of Marine Surveying and a Life Member of The Photographic Society of India.

 

 

 

 

Author: Milind Tambe FIIMS
ISBN: 978-1-911058-02-1
Size: 96 pages

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